Police Work, Politics and World Affairs, Football and the ongoing search for great Scotch Whiskey!

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

An important message about texting and driving...

If a bit nerdy:


Thanks Buddy B for the link.

Cigarette box TASER

Got this off of Kennesaw GA Facebook page. Scary to say the least.


This item was found in a vehicle during a traffic stop. While the officer was speaking to the driver outside of the car, the driver repeatedly asked to have a smoke which was located inside the vehicle. The answer was no. In the end, the only “smokes” found was the item in the video. You would be surprised at the type of weapons that have been made to look like “normal items”.

So, forgive us when we seem to act “too rigid” and “mean” when we say no to your request to “smoke” or “make a phone call” with your phone, etc... We’re just trying to make it home at the end of our shifts like everyone else out here.

Stay safe, everyone- its another beautiful day in Kennesaw!


Monday, April 17, 2017

STRATFOR: Turkey's President Wins Sweeping Powers in Cliffhanger Vote, April 16, 2017


Turkey's President Wins Sweeping Powers in Cliffhanger Vote

In an apparent cliffhanger victory, with challenges from the opposition still outstanding, the ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP) and President (and now party leader) Recep Tayyip Erdogan are claiming a hairline victory in a decisive referendum that will greatly empower the presidency. Some 48 million of 55 million eligible voters cast ballots on a raft of 18 constitutional amendments that will fundamentally alter the Turkish government, taking effect in the next scheduled election in 2019. With nearly all votes counted, the "Yes" vote garnered 51.34 percent of the vote with the "No" vote coming in close behind with 48.66 percent of the vote, according to state-run Anadolu Agency. Though the main opposition Republican People's Party (CHP) is not conceding the vote and is contesting at least 37 percent of the votes counted, the AKP is claiming victory. Still, the poll has shown just how deeply polarized the Turkish electorate has become: Erdogan has eked out a victory despite losing the three largest cities in the vote — Istanbul, Ankara, and Izmir. The AKP's razor-thin lead is a big reason why Erdogan feels compelled to resort to extraordinary measures to consolidate power.
A chart showing Turkish referendum results


Constitutional referendums are common in recent Turkish history, with six notable polls having taken place since 1961. The tug of war between granting powers to the parliament, the judiciary, the executive and the military is a decadeslong struggle in Turkey. But the April 16 referendum enables the most sweeping changes yet to the division of power between the executive and legislative branches, heaping additional powers on the president in an unprecedented way in Turkey. The vote is a culmination of a yearslong effort by Erdogan to formalize some of the powers he had already encroached upon as president. He will absorb the powers of the now-eliminated prime minister — historically the more powerful of the two positions — and will be able eschew nonpartisan rules and lead his own political party, dismiss parliament, choose judges that were once selected by their peers, announce a state of emergency, and enact some laws by decree. Overall, the legislative and judicial branches of the Turkish government will have diminished oversight on the presidency. The changes also allow Erdogan to run for two more terms, setting him up for possible rule until 2029.

It is highly unusual for an electoral victory in Turkey to be claimed without winning the largest metropolises. Istanbul and Ankara have been reliably in the AKP camp for years and Izmir, once an opposition CHP stronghold, has been trending toward the AKP in recent elections. According to results from state-run Anadolu Agency, in Istanbul, the "No" vote led with 51.34 percent against 48.66 percent "Yes;" in Ankara, 51.14 percent "No" to 48.86 percent "Yes;" and in Izmir, 68.78 percent "No" to 31.22 percent "Yes." The "No" vote was unsurprisingly ahead in predominantly Kurdish districts in Turkey's southeast, but the margin was smaller than expected. In the Mediterranean city of Antalya the results were: 59.06 percent "No" to 40.94 percent "Yes" and in Mersin, 64.01 percent "No" to 35.99 percent "Yes." Meanwhile, in overseas voting, 59.06 percent voted "Yes" while 40.94 percent voted "No," according to Anadolu Agency.

While "No" campaigners are casting suspicion on Turkish Electoral Board's decision to count unsealed ballots, this has been a common occurrence in recent Turkish polls. Opposition parties supporting the "No" vote, CHP chief among them, publicly doubt the legitimacy of the polls. Considering the state of emergency in place since last July's coup attempt in Turkey, there was concern among "No" voters that the government would use its institutional influence to secure victory in the April 16 poll. Should the ruling party feel the need to take a stronger hand in quelling opposition to the results, it could also leverage the ongoing state of emergency. Turkey's National Security Council is expected to decide on whether to extend or end the state of emergency shortly after the poll. It has been renewed in three-month increments since last July.

Turkey's shift toward a more authoritarian system under Erdogan will no doubt elicit further condemnation from the European Union, but European powers also understand that they still need Turkey's cooperation in containing migrant traffic and in keeping a check on Russia.

Turkish Prime Minister Binali Yildirim said last week that the government will revisit the stalled issue of EU visa liberalization for Turks and further threatened that Turkey's government could reassess the migrant deal with the bloc after the referendum. A more emboldened AKP following the vote will mean more friction in Turkey's already fragile negotiation with the European Union. As weather conditions improve and migrant traffic picks up, this will be a pressing concern for the European Union to manage with Turkey.

While the vote points to dramatic change for Turkey domestically in the long term, Turkey's foreign policy will remain largely unchanged. Regardless of a victory or defeat in the referendum, Turkey will still deepen its focus and presence in northern Iraq and Syria in an effort to contain Kurdish expansionism and face off with Iran in a broader proxy battle.
Turkey's President Wins Sweeping Powers in Cliffhanger Vote Turkey's President Wins Sweeping Powers in Cliffhanger Vote is republished with permission of Stratfor.

STRATFOR: The Islamic State Loses an Important Ideological Weapon, April 13, 2017

A summary of how IS uses articulate English speaking personnel to recruit followers, especially in the West.

Targeting the High Value Terrorists is republished with permission of Stratfor.
The Islamic State Loses an Important Ideological Weapon

Last week, the Islamic State released the eighth edition of its Rumiyah monthly magazine. Its cover story: an article lionizing Rumiyah's former editor, Ahmad Abousamra, who was killed in January by a U.S.-led coalition airstrike near Tabqa, Syria.

Other experts have already done a commendable job of retracing Abousamra's steps as he transformed from a graduate of the University of Massachusetts Boston's computer science program to a propagandist of terrorism. (I encourage readers interested in his past to look at the profiles compiled by CNN's Paul Cruickshank and the Long War Journal's Thomas Joscelyn.) Rather than repeating their good work, I'd like to use Abousamra's case to look at the importance of propagandists to extremist groups such as the Islamic State — and the impact their removal from the battlefield can have in the fight against terrorism.

Spreading the Word

As I noted a few weeks ago, propagandists have always played a crucial role in terrorist groups' recruitment and radicalization efforts. In fact, early anarchists viewed terrorism itself as a form of propaganda, spread with the help of the media. Advances in the printing press and telegraph enabled anarchists to transmit their messages worldwide; decades later, jihadists became the early adopters of the internet. The Islamic State is no exception, and it has used social media to give its propaganda an unprecedented global reach.

But technology is a tool that is only as effective as the message it conveys. Many different actors have tried to use social media to promote their ideologies or sell their products, but very few have seen the success that the Islamic State has. Part of the group's appeal can be attributed to the apocalyptic nature of its beliefs and the excitement it has generated by telling followers they can help bring about the final battle between good and evil. Yet such claims are hardly unique: There are plenty of other cults with similar views, some of which have even tried to bring about the end of days. What set the Islamic State apart were its dramatic victories on the battlefield in 2014, which lent credibility to the group's promises to conquer the world. But even so, those wins were greatly amplified by the skill of the propaganda team the Islamic State had assembled under Abu Muhammed al-Furqan, the man in charge of the group's media diwan, or department...

Wednesday, April 12, 2017

Radar for things other than speed..

As a part time libertarian (Sorry Reason magazine, but we don't need open borders, you are way off on that) I generally respect a "man in his castle," if you will. To the point my duties require me to go on, I don't try to invade another man's privacy.

Now this is something interesting. This would more accurate be called a scanner as opposed to a radar.
Police Start Using New Radar Guns That Detect More Than Just Speed

Police officers use radar guns to detect the speed of drivers. These tools come in handy because they make it easier for officers to pull over people who are speeding. The radar guns clock the driver’s speed. However, that is not the only thing that these radar guns can detect. Many people believe that police officers are only using these guns to track speed, but an officer can also use the gun to see whether a person is texting and driving.

Texting and driving is a serious problem. Despite the fact that there have been a lot of studies done to confirm that texting and driving is dangerous, many people still choose to do it. Some states have even made it illegal for people to text and drive. A company in Virginia has developed the guns.

These radar guns work by detecting radiofrequencies. The frequencies come from the cell phone. Sending a text message will give off a different frequency. If the police officers detect a text message frequency, then they will know that the person is texting while driving. This new radar gun is not on the market yet. However, it will be in the hand of officers soon.



I doubt they will be in the hands of cops anytime "soon." I gather it's still in development phase and it will have to be certified by the federal and state authorities. But point made, it's in the pipeline.

It will be very interesting to see how the courts rule on this.

Thursday, April 6, 2017

K9 Down

K9 Rooster
Wichita Police Department, Kansas
End of Watch: Saturday, March 18, 2017
Gender: M
Tour: 5 years
Cause: Gunfire

K9 Rooster was shot and killed while attempting an apprehension of a subject the scene of a domestic disturbance.

Officers had been sent to the mobile home in the 2300 block of East MacArthur Road to investigate the incident. A male subject exited the home with a firearm and the went back inside. The subject opened fire on K9 Rooster when he was released to attempt an apprehension.

Other officers on scene returned fire and killed the subject.

K9 Rooster had served with the Wichita Police Department for five years.

Rest in Peace Rooster…till our next roll call at the Rainbow Bridge!



In Memory of all Police Dogs

They handled themselves with beauty & grace
And who could ever forget that beautiful face
Whether at work; or at home; whatever the test
They always worked hard; and did their best

They were real champions; at work or at play
But their lives were cut short; suddenly one day
While working on the job with their partner one day
They put themselves out on a limb; out into harms way

They gave the ultimate sacrifice; any dog can give
They gave up their life; so someone could live
The best of their breed; as his partner and anyone would say
Many hearts are now broken; that he had to prove it this way

Now as the trees are blowing in the gentle breeze
The sun is shining; thru the leaves on the trees
The meadows are green; and the grass grows tall
Off in the distance they can see a waterfall

As they look over the falls; down through the creek
The water flows gently; as a rabbit sneaks a peek
Far up above; in the deep blue sky
They see the birds soar high; as they fly by

They see animals playing; at the bridge by a waterfall
Chasing each other; and just having a ball
They play all day; from morning to night
There's no more rain; just warm sunlight

Off in the distance; they hear trumpets blow
Then all the animals look up; and notice a bright glow
The harps would play and the angels would sing
As they know they've come home; they've earned their wings

We remember that they died; in the line of duty
And are now with the Lord; sharing in heaven's beauty
Off to the meadows now; where they can play and roam free
With an occasional rest stop; under a tall oak tree

No more bad guys to chase; or bullets to take
Just a run through the meadow; down to the lake
A quick splash in the water; then back to the shore
Then it's off to the forest; to go play some more

These special dogs are back home; up in heaven above
They're cradled in God's arm's; and covered with His love
We'll light a candle for all of them; in the dark of night
In loving memory of all; these very special knights

By John Quealy

STRATFOR: The St. Petersburg Subway Bombing, April 4, 2017

Stratfor Vice President of Tactical Analysis Scott Stewart discusses the unsophisticated nature of the explosive device used in the April 3 attack.





The St. Petersburg Subway Bombing "The St. Petersburg Subway Bombing is republished with permission of Stratfor.

Wednesday, April 5, 2017

Officer Down


Deputy Sheriff Kevin Michael Haverly
Greene County Sheriff's Office, New York
End of Watch: Tuesday, February 28, 2017
Age: 26
Tour: 4 years

Deputy Sheriff Kevin Haverly was killed in a single vehicle crash on Route 23, in Ashland, at approximately 6:15 am.

He was returning to the agency's satellite office in Ashland at the end of his midnight shift when his patrol SUV left the roadway and struck a utility pole.

Deputy Haverly had served with the Greene County Sheriff's Office for four years. He is survived by his wife, three children, mother, and sister.
Rest in Peace Bro…We Got The Watch

Nemo me impune lacessit

Day is done, Gone the sun, From the lake, From the hills, From the sky. All is well, Safely rest, God is nigh. 

Officer Down


Deputy Sheriff Michael Butler
Lowndes County Sheriff's Office, Georgia
End of Watch: Saturday, February 25, 2017
Age: 39
Badge # 21B

Deputy Sheriff Michael Butler was killed in a vehicle crash while responding to a domestic violence call at approximately 8:25 pm.

He was responding to the call with his emergency equipment activated when a tractor trailer crossed the center line as it attempted to turn right onto Cat Creek Road from Norman Hall Road. Deputy Butler was unable to avoid a collision and struck the trailer portion of the truck. The driver of the tractor trailer pulled Deputy Butler from the burning patrol car.

He was transported to South Georgia Medical Center where he succumbed to his injuries.
Rest in Peace Bro…We Got The Watch

Nemo me impune lacessit

Day is done, Gone the sun, From the lake, From the hills, From the sky. All is well, Safely rest, God is nigh. 

Tuesday, April 4, 2017

K9 Down


K9 Ranger
Forest Lake Police Department, Minnesota
End of Watch: Wednesday, February 8, 2017
Breed: German Shepherd
Origin: Czech Republic
Age: 9
Gender: M
Tour: 7 years
Cause: Heart attack
Incident Date: 2/7/2017

K9 Ranger suffered a fatal heart attack shortly after conducting an apprehension of a subject following a pursuit involving in the Minnesota State Patrol.

The vehicle pursuit ended in Forest Lake and the subject attempted to flee again in the area of U.S. Route 61 and Minnesota Route 97. K9 Ranger was released and performed an apprehension on the subject, who was then taken into custody.

Ranger began showing signs of a medical emergency after being placed back into his handler's vehicle. He was taken to the University of Minnesota Veterinary Medical Center, in St. Paul, where he died shortly before 1:00 am.

K9 Ranger was obtained from the Czech Republic and had served with the Forest Lake Police Department for seven years. He worked as an apprehension and narcotics detection dog.


Rest in Peace Ranger…till our next roll call at the Rainbow Bridge!



In Memory of all Police Dogs

They handled themselves with beauty & grace
And who could ever forget that beautiful face
Whether at work; or at home; whatever the test
They always worked hard; and did their best

They were real champions; at work or at play
But their lives were cut short; suddenly one day
While working on the job with their partner one day
They put themselves out on a limb; out into harms way

They gave the ultimate sacrifice; any dog can give
They gave up their life; so someone could live
The best of their breed; as his partner and anyone would say
Many hearts are now broken; that he had to prove it this way

Now as the trees are blowing in the gentle breeze
The sun is shining; thru the leaves on the trees
The meadows are green; and the grass grows tall
Off in the distance they can see a waterfall

As they look over the falls; down through the creek
The water flows gently; as a rabbit sneaks a peek
Far up above; in the deep blue sky
They see the birds soar high; as they fly by

They see animals playing; at the bridge by a waterfall
Chasing each other; and just having a ball
They play all day; from morning to night
There's no more rain; just warm sunlight

Off in the distance; they hear trumpets blow
Then all the animals look up; and notice a bright glow
The harps would play and the angels would sing
As they know they've come home; they've earned their wings

We remember that they died; in the line of duty
And are now with the Lord; sharing in heaven's beauty
Off to the meadows now; where they can play and roam free
With an occasional rest stop; under a tall oak tree

No more bad guys to chase; or bullets to take
Just a run through the meadow; down to the lake
A quick splash in the water; then back to the shore
Then it's off to the forest; to go play some more

These special dogs are back home; up in heaven above
They're cradled in God's arm's; and covered with His love
We'll light a candle for all of them; in the dark of night
In loving memory of all; these very special knights

By John Quealy


K9,  K9 Down, Officer Safety, Police, Police Training

How the job drains you...

The Houston Police Department lost a sergeant last Friday. No, not, officially, in the line of duty. We went to his station and shot himself. A friend of mine knew him and is still in shock.

By all accounts he was a "good cop," but like all cops, like all people, he had issues. I'm not going to speculate why, I've had family and fiends who've killed themselves. You're just left to wonder why, did you miss the signs and if there was anything you could have done.

I'd seen this article a few weeks ago and it was on my "to post" list, but the last few days makes it more relevant.


Police Officers Face Cumulative PTSD 
Police Officers Face Cumulative PTSDEditor’s Note: This article was originally published on American Military University’s blog, In Public Safety.  We are grateful that they have permitted us to share it with our audience.

Even with all we know about its effects and ways to treat it, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is common among police officers and continues to take its toll on their lives and those of their families. 
Most of what people think of as PTSD relates to trauma suffered by soldiers and those in the military. However, police officers’ PTSD is different. Soldiers often get PTSD from a single or brief exposure to stress. However, for police officers PTSD tends to manifest over time, resulting from multiple stress-related experiences. This is better known as cumulative PTSD. 
Understanding Cumulative PTSD 
Cumulative PTSD can be even more dangerous than PTSD caused from a single traumatic event, largely because cumulative PTSD is more likely to go unnoticed and untreated. When a catastrophic event occurs, such as an officer-involved shooting, most departments have policies and professionals to help an officer address and deal with the aftermath of an event. 
However, the build-up of events that arise throughout an officer’s career generally do not warrant such specialized attention. As a result, an officer with cumulative PTSD is less likely to receive treatment. Unlike a physical injury, a mental traumatic injury can happen almost daily. When the demon of PTSD surfaces it often goes ignored. If untreated, officers can become a risk to themselves and others. 
Causes of PTSDNumerous events can cause PTSD in police officers, such as hostage situations, dangerous drug busts, responding to fatal accidents, and working other cases that include serious injury or death. But there are many less traumatic situations that can still be extremely stressful for an officer. Other stressful situations include, but are not limited to: long hours; handling people’s attitudes; waiting for the next call and not knowing what the situation will be; and even politics within the department. Then, on top of it all, officers are frequently criticized, scrutinized, and investigated for decisions they make. 
[Related: The Impact of Stress and Fatigue on Police and Steps to Control It] 
Signs of PTSD 
If recognized early and treated properly, officers and their families can overcome the debilitating effects of cumulative PTSD. The key to early intervention and treatment is recognizing the signs of PTSD and seeking help sooner rather than later.
Some of the physical signs officers should look for in themselves include:
  • Fatigue
  • Vomiting or nausea
  • Chest pain
  • Twitches
  • Thirst
  • Insomnia or nightmares
  • Breathing difficulty
  • Grinding of teeth
  • Profuse sweating
  • Pounding heart
  • Diarrhea or intestinal upsets
  • Headaches
[Related: How Police Can Reduce and Manage Stress] 
Behavioral signs family members of officers and officers should look for in themselves and in others include:
  • Withdrawal from family and friends
  • Pacing and restlessness
  • Emotional outbursts
  • Anti-social acts
  • Suspicion and paranoia
  • Increased alcohol consumption and other substance abuse
Emotional signs include:
  • Anxiety or panic
  • Guilt
  • Fear
  • Denial
  • Irritability
  • Depression
  • Intense anger
  • Agitation
  • Apprehension
The situational training new recruits receive is simply not enough to prepare them for the reality of the experiences they will face throughout their careers. Most young officers do not understand the stressful events they are likely to experience during their years on the job. Many officers are also not adequately equipped with the emotional tools necessary to deal with the emotions they will feel when things happen. 
However, awareness continues to grow about the stress and trauma that officers’ experience. Organizations like the Station House Retreat offer both inpatient and outpatient treatment trauma therapy and peer-support services for police officers as well as all first responders. They also offer addiction treatment for first responders, and support for their family members.

About the Author: Michelle L. Beshears earned her baccalaureate degrees in social psychology and criminal justice and graduate degrees in human resource development and criminology from Indiana State University. She most recently completed her Ph.D. in Business Administration with a specialization in Criminal Justice. Michelle served in the U.S. Army for 11 years. She obtained the rank of Staff Sergeant prior to attending Officer Candidate School at Fort Benning, Georgia where she earned her commission. As a commissioned officer she led numerous criminal investigations and worked with several external agencies as well. As a civilian, she has worked with the local sheriff’s department, state drug task force and FBI. Michelle is currently an assistant professor of criminal justice at American Military University and is full-time faculty in the School of Security and Global Studies. You can contact her at Michelle.Beshears(at)mycampus.apus.edu.
A few weeks ago I had a new officer tell me he had a family funeral to attend, but he could be in only an hour or two late.  I told him "No, you will not be here...you will be with your family.  

Something to ingrain in new officers as they are trained (and continue to remind the) is that they need something other than the job, as it will burn you out.  Family, friends, hippies, etc take you away from your routine and prevent burn out.  The job will always her there.  But your kid will once be a year old once, and your dad will need you in a very difficult time.

Monday, April 3, 2017

Officer Down


Deputy Sheriff Michael Robert Foley
Alameda County Sheriff's Office, California
End of Watch: Thursday, February 23, 2017
Age: 60
Tour: 37 years

Deputy Sheriff Michael Foley was struck and killed by a prisoner transport bus in the parking lot of the Santa Rita Jail in Dublin, California, at approximately 6:00 am.

He was walking across the darkened parking lot when the bus accidentally struck him as it exited the facility. Deputy Foley was transported to a local hospital where he succumbed to his injuries.

Deputy Foley had served with the Alameda County Sheriff's Office for eight years and had previously served with the Concord Police Department for 29 years.
Rest in Peace Bro…We Got The Watch

Nemo me impune lacessit

Day is done, Gone the sun, From the lake, From the hills, From the sky. All is well, Safely rest, God is nigh. 

STRATFOR: Negotiating the Terms of the Brexit, March 31, 2017



Negotiating the Terms of the Brexit is republished with permission of Stratfor.