Police Work, Politics and World Affairs, Football and the ongoing search for great Scotch Whiskey!

Wednesday, May 5, 2021

Officer Down


Corrections Officer IV Jackson Pongay
Texas Department of Criminal Justice - Institutional Division, Texas
End of Watch Sunday, July 19, 2020
Age 56
Tour 4 years
Cause COVID19
Incident Date Thursday, June 25, 2020

Corrections Officer IV Jackson Pongay died after contracting COVID-19 during an outbreak among staff and inmates at the Lychner State Jail in Humble.

Officer Pongay had served with the Texas Department of Criminal Justice for four years. He is survived by his wife and one child.

In early 2020, thousands of law enforcement officers and other first responders throughout the country contracted COVID-19 during the worldwide pandemic due to requirements of their job. Many of these first responders died as a result of COVID-19.
Rest in Peace Bro…We Got The Watch

Nemo me impune lacessit

Day is done, Gone the sun, From the lake, From the hills, From the sky. All is well, Safely rest, God is nigh. 

Police and Use of Force

This is my first article on the American Free News Network. Please let me know what you think. 

American Free News Network

This is an opinion column. The thoughts expressed are those of the author.

Police and Use of Force

Mike Thiac 5/4/2021 5:29 AM

TITLE: Police and Force

 

With the Derek Chauvin trial completed in Minneapolis, the usual suspects are screaming for police “reform.” Among the issues these “activists” and “leaders” want changed is civil liability law, response to persons in mental health crisis, and police use of force. While I’ll go into more detail on specific “reform” issues later, I think it would be useful to simply look at the use of force overall. What the National Institute of Justice has entitled The Use-of-Force Continuum, from lowest to highest.

 

  1. Officer Presence, or Command Presence, if you will. What happens when you are driving and you see a police car? For most people, even if you are not speeding, you slow down. It’s a simple reaction to having a police authority nearby who can take action you may not like, such as giving you a ticket. But there are also other examples where just the presence of a peace officer gives you more civil environment. Countless cops work side jobs at bars, restaurants, or other places where alcohol is sold. When a group of friends go out, seeing a cop there may calm their drinking down, or if one of the friends has had enough, they mention, “Hey man, we don’t want the cop coming over…” Perhaps they just don’t want someone going to jail for public intoxication. Or it may be because one has some marijuana or other narcotic on them, and they don’t want to go to jail for that. Either way, a cop being there brings order to the area.

 

  1. Verbal Orders. Just like it sounds, the cop sees an issue, instructs people, and they comply. Years ago, I worked an extra job at a bar, and after the place shutdown people would flood onto the streets. I would instruct them to get back on the sidewalk, and generally people had no issue with this. When asked why, I explained, “The drunk morons driving may take a turn onto this street and run you down. And I hate doing DOA accidents, pain in the ass, tons of paperwork…” One young lady got the point when an idiot driver turned onto our street and then almost hit her. Again, not trying to be a party pooper, just trying to keep people from getting hurt. Or another example, I have a suspect I need to get into custody. And he is not inclined to go. Insuring he can see, and hear it, I get on my radio, and ask for backup. I’ve had to explain to more than one suspect, “You may take me, but two other officers are coming now. Can you take three? And I say two words on this radio, I’ll have fifteen to twenty officers running hot. You won’t win.” They get the point.

 

  1. Bodily force. Now things are getting “Physical.” It can be soft force on the suspect’s part, such as refusing to put his hands together, and preventing you from cuffing him. In that case, an officer can use a joint lock or hold technique to force his wrist closer so you can cuff him. Or if the suspect is on the ground, you can place a knee on the shoulder and twist the upper arm, pinning him to the ground. Or if things get more dynamic, it’s hands on fighting, i.e. punch, kick, or other physical force to protect yourself and take the suspect into custody. And when you get to this level, good chance you will go to the next level.

 

  1. Intermediate force, sometimes known as less-lethal force. Police have used batons for ages, from the London bobby to the one of New York’s Finest walking the beat. Over the years, intermediate weapons have expanded to chemical spray (e.g. Mace) or Conductive Energy Devices (CEDs, often known as TASERs). Two things to keep in mind about intermediate weapons:

 

  1. First, they give the officer a range of options to use in a dynamic situation. If a baton strike brings the suspect under control, great, But if he has a longer weapon, such as a bat, or crutch, Mace, a bean bag shotgun, or a CED will give you more range, and hopefully disable a suspect to remove any intermediate weapons.

 

  1. Second, remember, each of these intermediate weapons can be deadly force, depending on how they are applied. Baton strikes above the shoulder are considered deadly force, as they can cause permanent serious injury. A suspect with asthma may have a severe allergic reaction to chemical spray. CEDs can cause serious or permanent injuries if a dart hits a critical area (e.g. an eye or sexual organ).

 

  1. Deadly Force. To borrow the definition, “An amount of force that is likely to cause either serious bodily injury or death to another person.” Some examples are obvious, such as use of a firearm at any part of the body. It may be use of an intermediate weapon in a deadly manner. One of my training officers used a baton on a man’s head, and it was justified use of deadly force. Or another unique use of deadly force was Dallas Police using a robot to kill sniper Micah Johnson. A comment I hear occasionally from ignorant people, e.g. the current occupant of the White House, saying of LEOs, “Instead of standing there and teaching a cop, when there’s an unarmed person coming at them with a knife or something, you shoot them in the leg instead of in the heart is a very different thing.” Ah, hate to tell you Joe, a knife is a deadly weapon, so the man is armed. And if I shoot someone in the leg, and I hit the femoral artery, the man will likely bleed out in minutes.

 

Now that we got the basics, more to come. 

 

Michael A. Thiac is a retired Army intelligence officer, with over 23 years experience, including serving in the Republic of Korea, Japan, and the Middle East. He is also a retired police patrol sergeant, with over 22 years service, and over ten years experience in field training of newly assigned officers. He has been published at The American ThinkerPoliceOne.com, and on his personal blog, A Cop’s Watch

 

Opinions expressed are his alone and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of current or former employers.

 

 

Tuesday, May 4, 2021

Now writing for the American Free News Network.

Ladies and Gentlemen,

I’m proud to say I’ve been asked to join the American Free News Network as a contributing writer. My columns will cover law enforcement issues, and posted every Tuesday. Please take a look at my writing, and the other columnists. 

Monday, May 3, 2021

Officer Down


Deputy Sheriff William Garner
Franklin County Sheriff's Office, Georgia
End of Watch Sunday, July 19, 2020
Age 53
Tour 13 years
Badge 635

Deputy Sheriff Bill Garner was struck and killed by a vehicle while at the scene of a single-vehicle crash near mile marker 164 on I-85 at about 7:15 pm.

He was assisting the occupants of the involved vehicle when another vehicle lost control, entered the median, and struck him. Deputy Garner was transported to St. Mary's Sacred Heart where he succumbed to his injuries.

The man driving the vehicle that struck him was charged with homicide by vehicle.

Deputy Garner had served with the Franklin County Sheriff's Office for one year. He had previously served with the Oconee County Sheriff's Office and the Pendegrass Police Department for over 12 years. He is survived by his wife, parents, and brother.
Rest in Peace Bro…We Got The Watch

Nemo me impune lacessit

Day is done, Gone the sun, From the lake, From the hills, From the sky. All is well, Safely rest, God is nigh. 

Some intellectual consistency here, if you please…

While looking about today, I found this gem from Vox, a leftwing “news” sight. Now I have no issue with liberal (or conservative) opinion sights on the Web, in hard copy print, whatever the method. What I despise is their lack of truthfulness. No one with a two digit IQ calls the NY Times an objective news source. Breitbart and the Washington Times are conservative. The difference is they don’t lie about it. 


Now this “news article” got my attention by its outrage that a ruling from a federal court, in this case the Supreme Court, could overrule the gun control laws of the fifty states (or in the case of Obama, 57 states). Now I checked the link to the author, Ian Millhiser, and he is listed as a senior correspondenta person employed by a news agency, periodical, television network, etc., to gather, report, or contribute news, articles, and the like regularly from a distant place. He is not, at least openly, recognized as an opinion writer. Well, let’s see what the correspondent says about the Supreme Court and its pending review of New York’s gun laws.

The Supreme Court will hear a major Second Amendment case that could gut US gun laws


The Supreme Court could make the NRA’s dreams come true.


By Ian Millhiser  Apr 26, 2021


The Supreme Court announced on Monday that it will hear New York State Rifle & Pistol Association Inc. v. Corlett, a case that could transform the judiciary’s understanding of the Second Amendment and lay waste to many of the nation’s gun laws.

The case involves New York state’s handgun licensing law — a law that has been in place since 1913 — which requires someone who wishes to carry a handgun in public to demonstrate “proper cause” in order to obtain a license permitting them to do so


The plaintiffs in Corlett include a New York state gun rights group and two New York men who applied for a license to carry a handgun in public and were denied that license. They claim that “law-abiding citizens” have a Second Amendment right to carry a gun in public — and the Supreme Court, with its 6-3 conservative majority, could agree with them

The man is very incorrect on one point. The Supreme Court does not have a 6-3 conservative majority (we could only hope), we have a court with six of its nine members appointed by Republican presidents. The chief justice was originally thought to be solid choice. Time has shown he is not a conservative, but a member of the sewer that’s DC.

Indeed, Corlett could potentially dismantle more than a decade of judicial decisions interpreting the Second Amendment, imposing prohibitive limits on lawmakers’ ability to reduce gun violence.


Although the plaintiffs asked the Court to rule on a broad question — “whether the Second Amendment allows the government to prohibit ordinary law-abiding citizens from carrying handguns outside the home for self-defense” — the justices announced on Monday that they will only resolve a more narrow question: “whether the State’s denial of petitioners’ applications for concealed-carry licenses for self-defense violated the Second Amendment.”


Nevertheless, this narrower question is still broad enough to allow the Supreme Court to rewrite a decade of Second Amendment precedents, to unwind a consensus within the lower courts that permits many gun regulations to stand, and then to allow those lower courts to complete the process of dismantling other gun laws…

Now the author is referring to state issued gun laws and regulations, where blue states have the most restrictive. These Democratically controlled states also have the most crime. The states seem to only want to control the law abiding public’s access to firearms, not the criminal’s access to firearms. Let’s look some more.

How the Supreme Court’s current precedents approach the Second Amendment


The Second Amendment provides that “well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed,” and until fairly recently, the Supreme Court took the first 13 words of this amendment very seriously. As the Court explained in United States v. Miller (1939), the “obvious purpose” of the Second Amendment was to “render possible the effectiveness” of militias. Thus, the amendment must be “interpreted and applied with that end in view...” 

But again, back to my quest for intellectual consistency here. Mr. Millhiser is concerned that only one half of a right is protected by an amendment. Fair enough. Are we going to re-interpret the First Amendment that the press is actually only hard paper pressed out by a manual machine? I mean, you’re only looking at half the text, why should such selective emphasis be limited to only one amendment? 


Besides which, the question is, what is a militia? At the time of the drafting of the Constitution, it was every able bodied man. 

Militia, military organization of citizens with limited military training, which is available for emergency service, usually for local defense...Among the Anglo-Saxon peoples of early medieval Europe, the militia was institutionalized in the fyrd, in which every able-bodied free male was required to give military service. Similar arrangements evolved in other countries

In colonial America the militia, based on the tradition of the fyrd, was the only defense against hostile Indians during the long periods when regular British forces were not available. During the American Revolution, the militia provided the bulk of the American forces as well as a pool for recruiting or drafting of regulars. The militia played a similar role in the War of 1812 and the American Civil War

Again, every able bodied man was required to serve if needed. And he kept his weapons for that reason. But back to the intellectual aspect, I find it interesting that a liberal, writing for a very liberal publication, is worried about having state laws overthrown by a federal court. Since the court of Earl Warren, the federal courts have made that part of their MO. For instance, in Griswold v. Connecticut, 1965, by a 7-2 majority, the Supreme Court created a general right to privacy, and inferred it covered contraceptives:

In a 7-2 decision authored by Justice Douglas, the Court ruled that the Constitution did in fact protect the right of marital privacy against state restrictions on contraception. While the Court explained that the Constitution does not explicitly protect a general right to privacy, the various guarantees within the Bill of Rights create penumbras, or zones, that establish a right to privacy. Together, the First, Third, Fourth, and Ninth Amendments create the right to privacy in marital relations. The Connecticut statute conflicted with the exercise of this right and was therefore held null and void.

And this led to another abortion of law, Roe v. Wade:

In a 7-2 decision authored by Justice Douglas, the Court ruled that the Constitution did in fact protect the right of marital privacy against state restrictions on contraception. While the Court explained that the Constitution does not explicitly protect a general right to privacy, the various guarantees within the Bill of Rights create penumbras, or zones, that establish a right to privacy. Together, the First, Third, Fourth, and Ninth Amendments create the right to privacy in marital relations. The ConnecticuInherent in the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment is a fundamental “right to privacy” that protects a pregnant woman’s choice whether to have an abortion. However, this right is balanced against the government’s interests in protecting women's health and protecting “the potentiality of human life.” The Texas law challenged in this case violated this right… 

And Lawrence v. Texas and Obergefell v. Hodges… and others. 


The point is, for liberals, the states are just something to get around. They want a one size fits approach in all areas of law, and if the legislature doesn’t do it, they will use the one unaccountable branch of government, the courts, to push their agenda. 

Friday, April 30, 2021

Tonight is what it means to be young!!!!"

Unfortunately, not for its author, Jim Steinman

A prolific songwriter, he was most known for his collaboration with Meatloaf, writing classics like Paradise by the Dashboard Light, and Two Out of Three Ain't Bad. But he also wrote for other singers such as Bonnie Tyler (Total Eclipse of the Heart and Holding Out for a Hero), Air Supply (Making Love Out of Nothing at All), and Celine Dion (It's All Coming Back to Me Now). 

I've said more than once, the "artist" of today suck. Part of it is I'm am a child of the 70/80s, when the music was great. And the other is people from back then actually had talent. Sorry, singing "you're a bitch,  you're a ho!" for three minutes is not music, or art. Barely qualifies as sustainable noise. But for men like Steinman, he was a talent rarely seen. He was the man behind the artist, he put the words in the artist mouth, the music in front of the musician's instrument. And he will be deeply missed.

As a final tribute, I would like to post a lesser know example of his work. In 1984, Streets of Fire premiered, a Rock and Roll Fable. Steinman songs were not three minutes and a few seconds. His were at least six. Well, this movie didn't make a fortune, but it showed two great actors in their early career (Rick Moranis and Willem Dafoe), and featured two kick ass songs. The first, Nowhere Fast, from the beginning of the movie. And this classic of rock noir, Tonight Is What It Means Yo Be Young. Enjoy, and have a great weekend.


 

Officer Down


Master Sergeant Henry Turner
Louisiana Department of Corrections, Louisiana
End of Watch Saturday, July 18, 2020
Age 65
Tour 24 years
Cause COVID19

Master Sergeant Henry Turner died after contracting COVID-19 during an outbreak among staff and inmates at the Louisiana State Penitentiary in Angola.

Sergeant Turner had served with the Louisiana Department of Corrections for 24 years. He is survived by his wife and three sons. Two of his sons also work for the agency.

In early 2020, thousands of law enforcement officers and other first responders throughout the country contracted COVID-19 during the worldwide pandemic due to requirements of their job. Many of these first responders died as a result of COVID-19.
Rest in Peace Bro…We Got The Watch

Nemo me impune lacessit

Day is done, Gone the sun, From the lake, From the hills, From the sky. All is well, Safely rest, God is nigh. 

Wednesday, April 28, 2021

Officer Down


Corrections Officer V Jerry Esparza
Texas Department of Criminal Justice - Institutional Division, Texas
End of Watch Wednesday, July 15, 2020
Age 45
Tour 25 years
Cause COVID19
Incident Date Wednesday, June 17, 2020

Corrections Officer V Jerry Esparza died after contracting COVID-19 during an outbreak among staff and inmates at the Jester III Unit in Richmond, Texas.

Officer Esparza had served with the Texas Department of Criminal Justice for 25 years. He is survived by his wife and four children.

In early 2020, thousands of law enforcement officers and other first responders throughout the country contracted COVID-19 during the worldwide pandemic due to requirements of their job. Many of these first responders died as a result of COVID-19.
Rest in Peace Bro…We Got The Watch

Nemo me impune lacessit

Day is done, Gone the sun, From the lake, From the hills, From the sky. All is well, Safely rest, God is nigh. 

Tuesday, April 27, 2021

The Oscars bore everyone…

 But who cares.


When I was at Ft Carson CO (Colorado Springs) back in 89-92, the local rock station was KATM, The Kat. Routinely you would hear the catch phrase, “The Kat Rocks Colorado Springs,” or “The Kat Rocks Fort Carson.” Occasionally you’d hear, “The Kat Rocks Kansas. But who cares.” I had to think of that when I stumbled on the fact the Academy Awards were being held on Sunday the 25th

To steal the phrase, The Oscars suck. But who cares. I think the last time I watched the show was during the Billy Crystal years, and that man was entertaining. Hell, Whoopi Goldberg wasn’t bad. Compared to the last few years, David Letterman knocked it out of the park. I didn’t watch it, but to confess, I did check a list of actors, films, etc. Of the actors (lead and supporting), I knew 2 (Sir Anthony Hopkins and Gary Oldman), actresses’ one (Glen Close), and movies…none. 

I’ve said it for ages, Hollywood sucks. I don’t mind paying money for good entertainment, but it has to be entertaining, not leftist lectures about whatever is the flavor of the week. It’s pathetic when thousands of new books are released each year, Hollywood finds time and money to put out one sequel after another, or movie versions of TV shows. Or they don’t see the demand where it is. Even have a critical and financially successfully powerhouse of Braveheart, Met Gibson could not get any studio’s to take his next big project, The Passion of the Christ. He self-produced it, and worldwide it made over 600 million dollars. 

George Lucas said his reason for writing Star Wars was he wanted to produce a movie for a generation growing up without heroes. I watched Star Wars at least eight times (it was .50 cents for a kid to get into the movie back then) because it was, get this, entertaining. I showed my wife some classics she never saw before, such as The Quiet Man (The Duke is always good), CasablancaThe Maltese Falcon, and The Caine Mutiny (Bogie at his finest). They have radical things. An entertaining story, well written script, strong characters, character development during the film. There are reasons, over 50 years after it was released, you still must pay on video services to watch 2001: A Space Odyssey. You can get the lackluster sequel, 2010: The Year We Made Contact, for nothing. 

From this past Saturday’s NY Times, I have to say, I’m in agreement with Maureen Dowd. She makes some excellent points. 

Maureen Dowd

Crushed Dream Factory

Craving escapism from the Oscar contenders that reflect our sad reality.

WASHINGTON — People are talking about the Oscars this year.

Namely, how they won’t be watching. A lot of people don’t even realize the show, once an edge-of-your-seat American institution, is Sunday.

Movie stars don’t exist anymore. Movies have been swallowed by TV and streaming. The theaters are on life support; even the ArcLight on Sunset Boulevard, one of the most beloved movie palaces in a town full of cinephiles, could not be saved.

Norma Desmond’s everlasting declaration — “It’s the pictures that got small!” — has never seemed more true.

Sex, glamour, excitement and mystery are relics of a bygone era. Hollywood is now focused on worthy, relevant, socially conscious and lugubrious…

...Brooks Barnes, a Hollywood reporter for The New York Times, put it this way: “The Oscars forgot about its primary job — to sell Hollywood to the world, to be a big, fat commercial for the dream factory, the kind that makes financiers open their wallets and wannabe actresses get pinwheels in their eyes about the day they might be able to stand on that stage and give their acceptance speech.”

Truer words were never spoken. The entertainment business, is, Hollywood has forgotten, a business. The product/service they sell? Entertainment. Just like sports, etc. And when the people pushing their product spend much time insulting their customers, or their country, they wonder why the rating collapse? See below.

Surveys show that small percentages of people who watch movies have seen, or even heard of, the nominated films. (A whopping 15 percent are even aware of what the hell a “Mank” is.)

…Bill Maher made the point on his show that we could use more escapism in this year of plague and tumult.

“I don’t have to leave the theater whistling, but would it kill you once in a while to make a movie that doesn’t make me want to take a bath with the toaster?” he said, adding: “Academy nominations used to say, ‘Look what great movies we make.’ Now they say, ‘Look what good people we are.’ It’s not about entertainment, it’s about suffering, specifically yours…”  

I rarely agree with Bill Maher, but when he’s right, he hits it out of the park. And don’t worry Bill, the offended class have more to be offended by.

The Oscars Are Facing Backlash After Chadwick Boseman Didn't Win During A "Chaotic" Climax To The Show

"Did the Academy hold Best Actor until the end because they assumed Chadwick Boseman would posthumously win and then he didn't?"

The Academy is facing backlash and being accused of building Sunday night's Oscars ceremony around the late Chadwick Boseman and betting on him to win, only for the end of the show to fall into chaos when Anthony Hopkins won instead...

...When it became apparent that the Best Actor category would be the final award of the night, many thought that this would be an emotional and heartfelt nod to Chadwick Boseman, who was nominated for the first time...

...However, in what looked like a bet gone very wrong, people were left stunned when the award was eventually given to Anthony Hopkins for his role in The Father

Nothing against Mr. Boseman, but I never heard about him until his passing. I know it’s a combination of not enjoying what Hollywood is putting out, and just not caring who Hollywood is putting out. As I approach 60, I’m pretty much set in my ways, I’d rather watch my DVDs of Married with Children or All in the Family than a lecture on how we’re destroying the Earth, how we stole the United States from the Indians (but for some reason the actors will not pay rent to the Indian tribes), while capitalism sucks and socialism is great.

Back when I was in college (Mid-80s), I used to go to the movies 2-3 times a month. One, movies were cheaper then. Two, and more importantly, the movies were better. Now it’s 2-3 times a year (last one I think was A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood). Until movies improve, the product Tinseltown is putting out gets better, Hollywood will get less and less of my money. 

UPDATE:

I'm not the only person who thinks the Academy Awards suck:

Oscar ratings drop to an all-time low with unwatchable show

The Oscars ratings are in, and this year’s ceremony landed with a resounding whimper. 

About 9.85 million viewers tuned in, according to Variety, which is a more than 58% drop from last year’s all-time low of 23.6 million viewers. 2019’s ceremony garnered 29.6 million viewers. The ceremony landed a 1.9 rating for adults in the coveted 18 to 49 age demographic, a 64.2% drop from 2020. 

Despite the dismal viewership, the 2021 Oscars were full of several surprises, shockers and  charming moments... 

Yo, Hollyweird, it's not us. It's you. Get over yourself, and start working your product, not convincing us we are racists, sexists, etc. Other than that, I've got many more choices for entertainment than you.

Monday, April 26, 2021

Officer Down


Director N. Kyle Coleman
Bexar County Fire Marshal's Office, Texas
End of Watch Tuesday, July 14, 2020
Age 69
Tour 46 years
Badge 1600
Cause COVID19

Director Kyle Coleman died after contracting COVID-19 while coordinating the county's emergency response to the pandemic.

Director Coleman had served in law enforcement for 46 years. He had retired from the Bexar County Sheriff's Office before joining the Bexar County Fire Marshal's Office, where remained a sworn law enforcement officer and served as the county's director of the Office of Emergency Management. He is survived by his wife and two stepsons.

Director Coleman was a highly respected researcher of forgotten line of duty deaths in Texas and surrounding states. He was a regular contributor and researcher for the Officer Down Memorial Page and the Texas Peace Officers' Memorial Foundation. He was personally responsible for the discovery and research of countless line of duty deaths in Texas.

In early 2020, thousands of law enforcement officers and other first responders throughout the country contracted COVID-19 during the worldwide pandemic due to requirements of their job. Many of these first responders died as a result of COVID-19.
Rest in Peace Bro…We Got The Watch

Nemo me impune lacessit

Day is done, Gone the sun, From the lake, From the hills, From the sky. All is well, Safely rest, God is nigh. 

Friday, April 23, 2021

The Music of the Night...

One of the really miserable features of Covid is the closing of theaters. I love the theater, even if I don’t go as much as I can. Back in New Orleans, I used to go to the New Orleans Shakespeare Festival at Tulane University. Great work by local actors, saw King Lear and Much Adam About Nothing in one summer. 

Another classic I’ve seen live twice is The Phantom of the Opera. Once in the late 80s in New Orleans, and in 1998 in Houston. Hopefully it will come again this year. If you haven’t seen it, do yourself a favor and enjoy it. 

Well, here is an incredible version of the theme. Enjoy, and have a great weekend.


Officer Down


Police Officer Jonathan Shoop
Bothell Police Department, Washington
End of Watch Monday, July 13, 2020
Age 32
Tour 1 year
Badge 119

Police Officer Jonathan Shoop was shot and killed in the 10300 block of Woodinville Drive following a vehicle pursuit.

At approximately 9:40 pm Officer Shoop and his field training officer attempted to stop a vehicle for failing to display a license plate. The vehicle fled the stop, struck a man on a scooter, and then crashed on Woodinville Drive. The occupant of the vehicle emerged, made anti-police statements, and immediately opened fire on officers, who were still in the patrol car.

Officer Shoop's field training officer returned fire, during which Officer Shoop was inadvertently struck in the head and killed.

The man was apprehended six hours later, hiding on the roof of a nearby building.

Officer Shoop was a U.S. Coast Guard veteran and had served with the Bothell Police Department for one year. He is survived by his fiancée, mother, and two brothers.
Rest in Peace Bro…We Got The Watch

Nemo me impune lacessit

Day is done, Gone the sun, From the lake, From the hills, From the sky. All is well, Safely rest, God is nigh. 

Wednesday, April 21, 2021

Officer Down


Officer Roel De La Fuente
United States Department of Homeland Security - Customs and Border Protection - Office of Field Operations, U.S. Government
End of Watch Monday, July 13, 2020
Tour 19 years
Cause COVID19
Location Texas

Officer Roel De La Fuente died after contracting COVID-19 as the result of presumed exposure at the Pharr Commercial Facility in Hidalgo County, Texas.

Officer De La Fuente had served with the United States Customs and Border Protection - Office of Field Operations for 19 years. He is survived by his wife and two children.

In early 2020, thousands of law enforcement officers and other first responders throughout the country contracted COVID-19 during the worldwide pandemic due to requirements of their job. Many of these first responders died as a result of COVID-19.
Rest in Peace Bro…We Got The Watch

Nemo me impune lacessit

Day is done, Gone the sun, From the lake, From the hills, From the sky. All is well, Safely rest, God is nigh. 

Monday, April 19, 2021

Officer Down


Border Patrol Agent Enrique J. Rositas, Jr.
United States Department of Homeland Security - Customs and Border Protection - United States Border Patrol, U.S. Government
End of Watch Saturday, July 11, 2020
Age 53
Tour 22 years
Badge M168
Military Veteran
Cause COVID19
Location Texas

Border Patrol Agent Enrique Rositas died after contracting COVID-19 during a presumed exposure while on duty at the McAllen Station.

Agent Rositas was a U.S. Air Force veteran. He had served with the United States Border Patrol for 22 years and was assigned to the Rio Grande Valley Sector. He is survived by his wife, son, and daughter.

In early 2020, thousands of law enforcement officers and other first responders throughout the country contracted COVID-19 during the worldwide pandemic due to requirements of their job. Many of these first responders died as a result of COVID-19.
Rest in Peace Bro…We Got The Watch

Nemo me impune lacessit

Day is done, Gone the sun, From the lake, From the hills, From the sky. All is well, Safely rest, God is nigh. 

Sunday, April 18, 2021

Views on Black Lives Matter have changed…

Maybe it’s because people know more about this domestic terrorist group.

 As the Chauvin trial wraps up, and the Potter case starts, I found this column in FiveThirtyEight.Cominteresting. The author is obviously a supporter of BLM, and she seems confused why support for the group has fallen since June 2020. 

 

How Views On Black Lives Matter Have Changed — And Why That Makes Police Reform So Hard

By Alex Samuels

 

Daunte Wright was driving in his car through Brooklyn Center, Minnesota, two days ago when police officers…just 10 miles away from where Wright died, former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin was on trial for murder after kneeling on George Floyd’s neck for more than nine minutes last year.

 

Floyd’s death sparked a massive movement against police brutality and a sweeping shift in public opinion. And while it’s possible that in the wake of the latest tragedy, public support for reforming policing might increase again, new calls for change face a significant obstacle in public opinion. Gains in support for reform, especially among white Americans, tend to be fleeting, and there’s no consensus on what type of reforms the public wants.

No argument there. The American people may want some real improvements and reforms (not like bail/criminal justice reform, which has jacked up crime all over the US). Radical leftist like this woman don’t want reforms of law enforcment, they want it destroyed. 

Eleven months after Floyd’s death, support for the Black Lives Matter movement has fallen, while America’s trust in law enforcement has risen. Sixty-nine percent of Americans, according to a USA Today/Ipsos survey from March, now trust local police and law enforcement to promote justice and equal treatment of all races versus 56 percent who felt the same way last June.  

 

Meanwhile, in the almost four years Civiqs has been asking about support for the Black Lives Matter movement, a majority of white people have never supported the movement.1 Support peaked at 43 percent last June, just days after Floyd’s death. Since then, white Americans’ support for the movement has dipped back down to roughly where it was before Floyd’s death and is currently at 37 percent. 

 

Some of the biggest drops in support among white Americans occurred among older people (between the ages of 50 and 64), Republicans and men. Black Americans, meanwhile, have remained steady in their support of the movement. Overall, 85 percent of Black Americans say they support Black Lives Matter, compared to 88 percent last year…

The reasons for the decline in support among white Americans are myriad. Some experts have chalked it up to a decline in protests and less media coverage of ongoing calls for police reform, making it easier for white people to tune out issues of police brutality. It’s also worth noting, of course, that many protests for Black and civil rights start off unpopular, and people’s perception of the current movement might change over time; white Americans have gradually become more liberal on issues of race, for instance…  

Interesting, could it be the fact BLM (like Antifa) is an organized domestic terrorist group, and they don’t want to support them? Since the beginning of the riots BLM/Antifa in June 2020, damage cost have exceeded one-billion dollars, dwarfing the 1992 Rodney King riots in Los Angeles, or the 1968 Democratic Convention in Chicago. And it has not stopped. On April 17, 2021 these groups burned an Apple computer store, causing major damage to it and the businesses near it.  

And the fact is we don’t have a plague of police shooting unarmed black men. American police interact with the public over 70 million times a year. And in those interactions, police shoot and kill around one-thousand people a year. Of the one-thousand, how many are black males? Generally fifteen. Not exactly a swarm. 

Sorry Ms. Samuels, but the American people can see a false narrative when they see one. Looks like a fraud, sounds like a fraud, smells like a fraud, it’s a fraud. 

Friday, April 16, 2021

Officer Down

Police Officer Edelmiro Garza, Jr.
McAllen Police Department, Texas
End of Watch Saturday, July 11, 2020
Age 35
Tour 9 years

Police Officer Ismael Chavez
McAllen Police Department, Texas
End of Watch Saturday, July 11, 2020
Age 39
Tour 2 years, 6 months

Police Officer Edelmiro Garza and Police Officer Ismael Chavez were shot and killed from ambush while responding to a domestic disturbance call at a home in the 3500 block of Queta Street.

They had approached the front door of the home when they were suddenly ambushed and shot before drawing their weapons or making an emergency broadcast. Other officers who were sent to check on them came across the scene and immediately requested backup.

The subject who ambushed them committed suicide as additional units arrived on scene.

Officer Garza had served with the McAllen Police Department for nine years.

Officer Chavez had served with the McAllen Police Department for 2-1/2 years.
Rest in Peace Gentlemen…We Got The Watch

Nemo me impune lacessit

Day is done, Gone the sun, From the lake, From the hills, From the sky. All is well, Safely rest, God is nigh.